IDW: In Memoriam - John Lewis, Congressman, Icon, Beloved Author

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Alex Haley: And the Books That Changed a Nation

Alex Haley wrote The Autobiography of Malcolm X (as told to him), and Roots, the story of his family from Africa through slavery and the Civil War. Separately, these books had a profound impact on how the United States viewed race relations and its own history. Together, their influence could hardly be overstated, and that is what Robert J. Norrell argues in Alex Haley: And the Books That Changed a Nation, the first biography of Haley and a study of his two seminal works and the controversies they fostered.

Norrell covers Haley's forebears and Tennessee childhood, his three marriages and a writing career growing from the Coast Guard (where ghost-writing personal letters led to public relations assignments) to magazine work, which led to his interviewing Malcolm X for Reader's Digest and Playboy. The process for Malcolm's Autobiography (1965) was dynamic, as Haley walked the fine line between Malcolm's voice and Haley's more moderate political position, and as Malcolm's views on race relations evolved. The Pulitzer Prize-winning Roots (1976) was even harder won, as Haley drew a short book contract out over more than 11 years of research and travel. The effect of the book, and its accompanying television miniseries, was astounding. And yet the rest of his life and work would be shadowed by accusations of copyright infringements and invention in what Haley called a work of nonfiction.

With sensitivity and careful study, Norrell examines Haley's embattled life and extraordinary achievements. His final conclusion about this "likeable narcissist" is that despite Haley's imperfections, his influence was prodigious and deserves our respect and continued study today. --Julia Jenkins, librarian and blogger at pagesofjulia